GLAZING TUTORIAL GUEST POST FROM REDOUX

Well, if you are curious as to where I am this week, I am in the most magical place on earth, that is Disney World, with my family. I left this morning with a heavy heart as my neighborhood was hit really hard with damaging straight line winds. Trees down everywhere around me. As we traveled I watched our local weather man, Mr. James Spann, show me continuous coverage of several F4 and F5 tornadoes that devistated my state and my city. Praise the Lord my family is safe but many were not so lucky. Please, I ask you to pray for the many families who have lost loved ones, homes, businesses and much more. We will have a lot of re building to do.
On a much lighter note,
 I have lined up some really great bloggers who are new to blogging to share with you some fantastic tutorials. It seems like yesterday that I was a new blogger! Gosh…it really was only 6 months ago! I still get excited when I see that I have a new follower. I just love y’all…really, I do. I hope you enjoy all of these ladies this week because they have some awesome things to share with you!
Thank you to all of you who subitted guest posts! If I didn’t chose you this time, I promise you are on my list if I need you again. 


Okay gals…you are all in for a REAL treat! Karen from Redoux is here today to give us a glazing tutorial!! She is a pro!! I just adore this girl! Make sure you check out her blog so you don’t miss any good nuggets of valuable information. Karen also has a new link party for furniture redouxs on Fridays.
 
 So here we go………..

Hi there, I am thrilled to be guest posting today at Restore Interiors. Kelli and I “met” in an interesting way…..I was on my way to visit family in Utah and I sat down next to the nicest couple from Birmingham, Alabama. I got chatting with Kelli’s sweet mother- in-law and we discovered that Kelli and I were both in the same line of work, with little kids under foot, and a passion for giving new life to “old things”.

We exchanged emails, and “Mary” gave me the blog address of Kelli’s sight. I was just getting my blog underway and was hesitant to reach out to Kelli until I had “beautified” my sight a bit. I checked out Kelli’s blog and I felt like I was looking at the Southern equivalent of me! Lo and behold, Kelli emailed me first, and a great friendship was born online. One of these days I will make my way to Birmingham, or Kelli will make her way to San Francisco, but until then, she is one cute girl that I am thrilled to call my friend and feel honored to be posting today:

I love to Glaze furniture and cabinetry!

Let me begin by telling you, I have never met a surface I couldn’t glaze. The piece I am using in this tutorial is a White Laminate Cabinet Door I purchased from the “scratch and dent” section of Ikea.

With a good bonding primer, you can paint and glaze any surface you desire, don’t believe me?

Head over to my blog and check out cabinets.

I have had a lot of requests for the glaze formulas I use. I mix all my own glazes, and use only Modern Masters products in my glazes.

There are many available Glaze Mediums for purchase in Paint Stores.
Glaze can be tricky, and can dry too fast on you sometimes before you get the “look” you want.

Modern Masters Glaze Cream has a very long “open” time, which allows you plenty of time to work with it until you get it right.

You can even add more as you go, which most glaze mediums do not like to do. 

There are many fantastic products on the market, I just prefer to mix my own because that allows me control over how dark or light, warm or dark brown, red toned, or gold toned, etc. I want my glaze to be.

I typically use a one part colorant to four parts glaze recipe.

:

You could also try this by using a good acrylic paint brand such as this one,which is available at most craft stores:

I would recommend using a warm brown or a sepia tone (for a redder glaze)
The list is endless, and the possibilities are endless.

Glaze is a fun product to try out. Just be patient. It can take a bit of practice to get it right. There are as many ways to apply and wipe off Glaze as there are products.

I do A LOT of glazing, and have found this method to be my favorite:

Supply List:

Cheese Cloth (which is easily purchased from the “wood stain” section of any home improvement store)


Chip Brushes, large and small


Latex Gloves (Glaze can make a mess of your hands and looks like icky dirty fingernails if you get it under your nails, yuk!)

Begin by using a chip brush and apply the glaze liberally over one surface at a time.

(i.e., if you are doing a dresser, I would start at the top and work my way to the sides, then do the drawers, other pieces separately, etc.)

I recommend starting in the middle and working your way outward, this way, you don’t get uneven application of glaze. Completely cover one surface with glaze before you start “subtracting” it.

Take your Cheese Cloth, and scrunch it up to look like “pom pom”.

You will use the big fluffy part to wipe off your glaze. Begin by wiping in the middle. I like to go up and down in long, even strokes, and work my way to the outside.

If your “pom pom” cheese cloth gets too much glaze on it, just keep rotating it until it is all full of glaze.

(Note: you can reuse your Cheesecloth’s many times, just throw them in the wash on a gentle cycle and hang them up to dry, good as new!)

After you have achieved the level of Glaze you want to have remain, put the pom pom aside and switch to a “softening” brush to blend the glaze to perfection. You don’t want to see streaks and such, and you have better control if you lightly “feather” brush over the areas you want to blend.

You can also “add” more glaze at this point if you find you have taken too much off, then simply go back over it again with the softening brush. This is a great tip I picked up from Barb at “Knack Studios”

When you are satisfied, step back and admire your work!

Now you have a perfectly “aged” piece of furniture.

For Modern Masters Products, either go to their website:

www.modernmaster.com

Or you can order from Annette Sheppard at

 
annette@artisticaccentwalls.com
 
Thank you so much Karen! Now go get to glazing y’all!
www.redoux.blogspot.com

Comments

  1. This is a great tutorial!!! You rock! I need to try glazing this way…I have been using a glazing product I buy off the shelf….I think I need to change to MM!

  2. This is a great tutorial!!! You rock! I need to try glazing this way…I have been using a glazing product I buy off the shelf….I think I need to change to MM!

  3. Thanks for sharing this wonderful tutorial. I have done some glazing but these tips will help me to make the end product better.

  4. Thanks for sharing this wonderful tutorial. I have done some glazing but these tips will help me to make the end product better.

  5. Thanks for the glazing tips! I'll be trying this!
    Debbie

  6. Thanks for the glazing tips! I'll be trying this!
    Debbie

  7. You make it look so easy! Thanks for the post & pics.

  8. You make it look so easy! Thanks for the post & pics.

  9. I have no idea if you’ll know the answer to this, but I’m trying to “sepia” a large black and white architectural print. I have four 2×2 – 2×3 feet prints of my family that I want to have a sepia tone to better blend with the room they’re in. The plan is to frame them with extra glass as a border before the wood frame so they look like a set with a framed wall decal that is actually applied to framed glass. The prints are laser printed so they should be able to get wet without smearing. Do you think this technique would work to give them an antique-y sepia tone? If not, any suggestions on what medium to use to acheive my goal?

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