THICK CHALK PAINT? { NO PROBLEM}

I got ready to do some painting this morning and realized the lid on my pure white chalk paint had not been on good for months. Air got to it and it was thicker than molasses, even a little clumpy. Not only was it thick but there was rust and flakes of dried paint all around the rim. I knew if I poured it or put my brush in it, the flakes would get in my paint. Has this ever happened to you? I almost threw it away but I was thinking, good grief, this is A LOT of money in paint. I thought better of it and realized that this paint thickens on purpose sometimes for some artists. All you have to do is add water and it is back to perfect. However, you don’t want to do it in the can because the lid is messed up and the crud around the edges will get in your paint. You need an air tight seal. You can buy plastic lids from Stacey at Faux Studio Designs, but I didn’t have any on hand so I used a mason jar. Who doesn’t love a good mason anyway? I cut a small piece of tin foil to line the rim where I would be pouring so that none of the nasty dry crud would get in my paint. I poured over the foil and into the jar. I just added a tiny bit of water to the jar, stirring as I went with a paint stir until I got the consistency I needed. Now I have an air tight container and a whole lot of white paint! Problem Solved…..

Thick paint

I hope your day is prosperous and blessed! Love you all…….
Signature

Comments

  1. Thanks for the great tips! I have a bad habit of not closing the lid all the way, so my chalk paint gets a little thick sometimes. I might just transfer all my cans over to mason jars. That way I don’t have to find the rubber mallet every time I need to close it! Just twist the top on and I’m done! ;)
    Allison

  2. Love the tin foil tip! All my chalk paint needs transferring .
    Smiles, Alice

  3. Theresa says:

    Great Ideas!! Thanks for sharing!!

  4. There are times, like you said when you want to thicken up your paint and other times it’s nice to have it thinned down for a wash. I do that with my paint all the time. The most important thing I recommend to customers is to use distilled water so you don’t contaminate the paint. Gotta love stretching the paint though. Another great part about keeping it in mason jars is you can easily see the pretty colors :D

  5. Monica says:

    gee I cannot believe I never thought of using foil. I used a small cup to scoop all the paint out to avoid the rim!!!

  6. Beth says:

    Good idea! Thats the only drawback to these cans. You can avoid the problem entirely if you pour your paint in a different container instead of painting directly from the can. I use a wide plastic cup. If I want to stop, I just place the cup inside a ziplock baggie. Any leftovers can be poured back into the can and the lid stays clean!!

  7. Theresa says:

    Great idea with the foil and mason jars! I also use painters tape to label my paints as to which project(s) it was used for touch ups or repeats. Also, I have learned that if you take a nail and punch holes in the inside rim of your paint can, it will let the paint drain out and limit the build up on the lip. (that is if your paint is still thin) :0) Great blog!! Thanks for sharing!!